Vittorio De Sica

Bicycle Thieves

Bicycle Thieves

Hailed around the world as one of the greatest movies ever made, the Academy Award–winning Bicycle Thieves, directed by Vittorio De Sica, defined an era in cinema. In poverty-stricken postwar Rome, a man is on his first day of a new job that offers hope of salvation for his desperate family when his bicycle, which he needs for work, is stolen. With his young son in tow, he sets off to track down the thief. Simple in construction and profoundly rich in human insight, Bicycle Thieves embodies the greatest strengths of the Italian neorealist movement: emotional clarity, social rectitude, and brutal honesty.

Film Info

  • Vittorio De Sica
  • Italy
  • 1948
  • 89 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.37:1
  • Italian
  • Spine #374

Special Features

  • New digital restoration (4K on the Blu-ray), with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Working with De Sica, a collection of interviews with screenwriter Suso Cecchi d’Amico, actor Enzo Staiola, and film scholar Callisto Cosulich
  • Life as It Is, a program on the history of Italian neorealism, featuring scholar Mark Shiel
  • Documentary from 2003 on screenwriter and longtime Vittorio De Sica collaborator Cesare Zavattini, directed by Carlo Lizzani
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by critic Godfrey Cheshire and reminiscences by De Sica and his collaborators
    New cover by F. Ron Miller

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New digital restoration (4K on the Blu-ray), with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Working with De Sica, a collection of interviews with screenwriter Suso Cecchi d’Amico, actor Enzo Staiola, and film scholar Callisto Cosulich
  • Life as It Is, a program on the history of Italian neorealism, featuring scholar Mark Shiel
  • Documentary from 2003 on screenwriter and longtime Vittorio De Sica collaborator Cesare Zavattini, directed by Carlo Lizzani
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by critic Godfrey Cheshire and reminiscences by De Sica and his collaborators
    New cover by F. Ron Miller
Bicycle Thieves
Cast
Lamberto Maggiorani
Antonio Ricci
Enzo Staiola
Bruno Ricci
Lianella Carell
Maria Ricci
Gino Saltamerenda
Baiocco
Vittorio Antonucci
The thief
Giulio Chiari
The beggar
Credits
Director
Vittorio De Sica
Screenplay
Vittorio De Sica
Cinematography
Carlo Montuori
Producer
Giuseppe Amato
Producer
Vittorio De Sica
Story
Cesare Zavattini
Screenplay
Suso Cecchi D’Amico
Screenplay
Gerardo Guerrieri
Based on a novel by
Luigi Bartolini
Screenplay
Cesare Zavattini
Sound
Gino Fiorelli
Editing
Eraldo Da Roma
Music
Alessandro Cicognini

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