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    • Pedro Almodóvar is everywhere! Coinciding with the release of his latest film, Julieta, and a career retrospective now playing at the Museum of Modern Art, the New Yorker’s in-depth profile on the Spanish auteur examines his creative habits and the cultural context of his work.
    • Julieta finds itself in good company on John Waters’ annual top ten list, which also includes Richard Linklater’s Everybody Wants Some!! and Terence Davies’s A Quiet Passion.
    • For another take on Almodóvar, read Julie Bloom on his deep affinity for the women in his films. “I will write male and female characters,” he says, “but I do find at least in Spanish culture, women to be more vivacious, more direct, more expressive, with a lot less of a sense of being fearful of making a fool of themselves.”
    • Speaking of essential writing on cinema, the New York Review of Books has just published new translations of Robert Bresson’s Notes on the Cinematograph and a collection of the director’s interviews. Dennis Lim reviews them for Bookforum.
    • In a new essay on Yasujiro Ozu, Paul Schrader compares the Japanese master with Bresson: “They both understand the power of withholding.”
    • French artist Vincent Mahé has created wonderful new screen prints for Jacques Tati’s PlayTime.
    • Check out a collection of rare photos of Francis Ford Coppola taken in 1969, on the eve of the opening of American Zoetrope.
    • La dolce vita, Last Year at Marienbad, and Jules and Jim are just a few of the films Jackie Kennedy screened at the White House.
    • Tippi Hedren recounts her experience working with Charlie Chaplin on A Countess from Hong Kong. “It was interesting to meet Chaplin after Hitchcock,” she writes. “Their directing styles were so different. Chaplin’s method was to act out all our different roles, which was brilliant to watch. Instead of directing, he’d get out there on set and say: ‘OK, do this,’ and show us how.”
    • And in another look inside the acting life, Greta Gerwig and Mahershala Ali discuss the ways in which New York City sustains their creative energies.

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