Film_2w_sevensamurai_original

Criterions I've been lucky enough to see

by mrfun0000

Created 08/29/12

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I'm still just getting started and am gradually seeing more films in the collection, though not as fast as new ones are coming out. In time I hope to see them all. Here is a list of all the Criterion films I have been lucky enough to see...and loved.

  • Undoubtedly one of the best movies I have ever seen. It was my first samurai and first Kurosawa film and am very excited to see more. This movie kept me enthralled throughout the entire 3 hours even though I had seen both The Magnificent Seven and the anime version before seeing this. That is how good I think Kurosawa is. I also fully expect to love Mifune in anything else that I see him in.

  • A brilliant film. Bergman did a great job at making this film stick in your mind with all the characters and the imagery. He managed to make it sort of scary and disturbing, not in the traditional way of a horror movie but in a very real way that makes you think about how people actually used to do this shit. How easy would it have been to get yourself into trouble by offending the wrong person or having the wrong beliefs? The transfer I thought was also fantastic. A black and white film you actually should watch on blu-ray.

  • I really enjoyed this movie, but it confused me. Not so much the movie itself but just in what it made me think about. I naturally put myself in the place of these two kids. The adventurer in me thinks it would be so cool to travel through the Outback, truly experiencing raw nature. Yet the realist in me doesn't know what I would do or how well I would survive. As far as the actual movie goes I do want to know what the hell was up with the father that he randomly seemed to do what he did. Psycho. I admit that I didn't see the ending coming, but it made perfect sense. In retrospect I don't see how it could have ended any different.

  • I had seen parts of this movie sporadically since middle school and didn't think it was all that great. Only once I got into Criterion I watched it on tv and really liked it. I know it is one of those comedies that will get funnier the more you watch it. What is truly great about it is that the songs are not only funny, but also catchy and could easily have been songs from a real band in the 80s. They aren't any more suggestive than songs like 'Love Gun' or more ridiculous than songs like 'Safety Dance' or that whole Wang Chung thing. How can you not love the amp going up to 11 scene?

  • I had wanted to see this movie for so long and finally did when I bought a used OOP copy online. So often when you want to see what is considered a great movie for so long you are left disappointed when you finally see it. That was not the case here. It was everything I hoped it would be. Anthony Hopkins is definitely one of my favorite actors today. I enjoyed the entire series, though this one was clearly the best. I love psychological stuff.

  • I thought this movie was going to be too cheesy and a cheap thrill. Maybe it was, but I still liked it. When you factor in the 80s and how groundbreaking the effects were, you have to give this film its due. Loved Kurtwood Smith as the gang leader.

  • My first Godard film. It lost me a little at the beginning because I did not understand what the hell was going on. I eventually figured it out, but this is not an easy watch. After reading a little about Godard and talking to a friend I realized that is just his way. He enjoys experimenting and messing with the audience. In fact I first thought my disc was defective because of the random black screens and color disfigurement Godard throws in near the end. I have since told many people to watch this movie. A truly satisfying end as well.

  • What a bizarre movie. Exactly what you would expect from Andy Warhol.

  • The concept here is just brilliant. Dennis Hopper is one crazy guy. You would think everything he said and did was scripted.

  • I needed to make myself watch this movie even after I bought it OOP. In the descriptions nothing seemed to stand out that made me want to watch it, plus its 3 hours long. However I am glad I did buy and watch it. Daniel Day-Lewis is great in everything as is Juliette Binoche. Lena Olin stole the show of course and is absolutely gorgeous. I think I will get more out of it the next watch. Also have to give Philip Kaufman props for turning an "unfilmable" book into a pretty good movie. Might have to consider reading the book.

  • I knew that I would like this movie. A psychological thriller that is right up my ally. The background of the film and how it negatively affected Powell's career fascinates me. The fact that there are so many similarities between this film and 'Psycho' and that their directors received completely opposite criticisms is such good evidence of the times and how they have changed.

  • This is a movie that I saw many many years ago and know that I liked it. At this point though I do not remember a whole lot of it. I also know that I don't think it is as good or as funny as Holy Grail which in my opinion is one of the funniest movies ever! I simply need to watch it again as I am sure I will enjoy it more. Especially since I was young enough that a lot of the jokes probably went over my head.

  • Another movie I need to watch again. However I know I love this movie as I love all of Wes Anderson's films. This is the only one that I do not have that is available on Criterion. It will be one of my next purchases

  • This is a movie that I bought only because it was a Criterion that I found for only $5. I am not a fan of Kevin Smith and can not stand the other movies he has done. Having said that, I can not say the same thing about this film. I really enjoyed it and laughed a lot. Chasing Amy is in every way a smarter movie than say, Clerks or Mallrats. It was also much more classy. In the end I am glad I bought it.

  • After one watch I fell in love with this movie. It is one that I watch over and over. I rank it along with The Big Lebowski as the funniest movie of all time. So many quotable lines. I repeat these lines to death every time I watch it. Richard Grant is fantastic! I tell everyone to watch this movie and show it to as many people as I can.

  • Another funny one. I immediately remembered an episode of 'Doug' when they sort of spoofed this movie. Richard Grant fantastic once again.

  • Perhaps more than any other film in the collection this one seemed to be hyped up a lot. People recommended it to me so often and it was on so many peoples' Top Ten lists both on the Criterion website and off. Once again Criterion did not disappoint. Everything I was told, everything that I read was completely 100% right. Great movie! More than any other film this one truly got into the heart and soul of its subject matter. You truly understand what Guido is all about by the end. You feel with him even if you can't relate to him. Another great transfer too. A black and white worthy of blu-ray.

  • Fantastic cast! So many people I have always liked. Some scenes that stick with you for a while. I felt the characters were very surprising in the sense that once you think you know them many of them do something you didn't expect.

  • What else needs to be said other than...cast, wit, Wes Anderson? Love it!

  • The writings of Hunter S Thompson are one of a kind. Johnny and Benicio are great. That is all that needs to be said.

  • Bill Murray is one of my favorite actors, has been since I was a kid. This is my favorite Wes Anderson and I enjoy it more each time I watch it. It is so quirky and I love the animated sea life thrown in.

  • It is so hard for me to pick a favorite movie, I can usually only attempt an answer if I break it down and say favorite comedy, favorite action, etc. But if I was forced to come up with a favorite movie, factoring in everything, this one would definitely be in the mix. I also used the supplements of this release as training wheels to get me ready for director commentaries and supplements of more serious art house type films like The Seventh Seal. This was the first director commentary I ever watched.

  • I was surprised how much I laughed out loud at this witty comedy. Usually at this type of movie I smile and snicker at the funny stuff, but this one had me really laughing at some great one liners. I would love to see Noah Baumbach and Whit Stillman do a movie together. There styles and even content are very similar.

  • A true indie film if there ever was one. The robbery scene is just classic!

  • I personally think that Brad Pitt is highly over-rated, but this is one of the few films where he is good (Kalifornia is by far his best performance). David Fincher is one of the best directors out there today. When you compare this to nearly any other Criterion film I can understand many people being upset over its inclusion. Having said that, it is still a high quality movie and it can help bring in money and appeal to a different demographic. That way Criterion can afford to restore old films, acquire the rights to different films, and perhaps even reacquire the rights to films now OOP.

  • To get this film you really need to listen and watch it numerous times because it is so easy to miss a lot of the funny remarks since so much of the film is dialogue amongst many people. Witty and funny. I would not have minded being in the club all the characters go to at least once.

  • Visually this film is fantastic. So many colors, its just a joy to watch. It is so fun to watch with a group of people and just laugh at the cheesy dialogue.

  • I find this to be the oddest of all of Wes Anderson's films and that is a good thing. In the rest there is just one main person who is kind of a self absorbed jerk, but this one has three. I love how whenever one or two of them is acting like a normal somewhat likeable person, the third is being a classic Wes character. I would also say that this film also has the most underlying themes than any of his others. The emphasis on family and spirituality transcends this film to me.

  • I knew all about this film before I saw it thanks to an article I read. Therefore I was ready for all the worst imagery and could even shut my eyes at the one part I did not want to see. I think anyone who has seen this film knows which part I am talking about. However, I still was not ready for it. This was my first Lars film and I regret that. I like his films, but this is not the one to start with. This film shook me, which never happens. I told friends to avoid it and was in shock when one told me he had watched it 3 straight days in a row. This friend was able to convince me to watch it again and really think about what the film was saying. I still need to see it again, but I now like it and am convinced of its genius. Still not for everyone though. Charlotte and Willem are just incredible.

  • I bought this movie and it just sat for a good while simply because I could not find the time to watch it (which happens far too often with me). Then I had knee surgery and was laid up for a couple of weeks. My younger cousin came over to hang out and he mentioned that he was getting into Chaplin, so we watched this one. It was my first experience with Chaplin (It actually was my first experience with silent films altogether) and as I expected, I loved it. My cousin loved it too and I can not wait to see more.

  • What can I say here other than that Dennis Hopper is one of my favorite actors. And clearly he can direct too. Music was great and the plot was rather simplistic. Hopper just did so much with the concept of two hippies going cross country on their motorcycles. One of the most saddening and riveting endings ever.

  • I wanted to see this for so long after Criterion announced its release. The story sounded so interesting and del Toro is an artist. He knows how to make a film look good and be interesting. He just loves the occult and I didn't know how much until I saw that supplement where he gives the viewer a tour of his man cave (or should I say man mansion?). Finally got to see this at a Halloween party, very fitting.

  • The only thing I know about Andrea Arnold is that she directed this film. That is why I would call this film one of the few diamonds in the rough of the Criterion Collection. Arnold is an up and coming director and the film is newer, so neither has stood the test of time. It is a good movie and I applaud Criterion for finding and taking a chance on it. From what I have heard, everyone expects more great things from Arnold and I think she will have another film in the collection in the next few years. Michael Fassbender is fantastic as always and newcomer Katie Jarvis was captivating.

  • Few films offer as much as this one does. Comedy, thrills, romance, a sexy Melanie Griffith, questioning who you are as a person. Not to mention Jeff Daniels who is one of my favorite actors and who would have thought a mind blowing performance by Ray Liotta.

  • Another film that excited me as soon as Criterion announced its release. Just a brilliant film by Roeg. I could probably analyze and discuss this film more than any other and can not wait to buy it and watch all of the supplements. Without doubt one of my favorite films in the collection.

  • Loved this film!! Charles Laughton, a Criterion regular, was great!! I can't wait to see more of his films.

  • I first saw this film in my 9th grade Civics class. This was long before I really got into films and even then I loved this film. I am also a Social Studies teacher and would show it to my students as well. I like to think that I could do the same thing that Henry Fonda did. Just a fantastic movie, one of my favorites in the collection!

  • Over the years I am starting to like court room dramas more and more. Hence the previous entry. I thoroughly enjoyed this one as well. One I look forward to learning more about.

  • I will never be able to relate to or understand Harold. Sure his family sucks, but he doesn't really have a reason to be so depressed. He is interesting, but he annoys me. Maude is off the wall and I wish I knew an old person like that. I still can't relate to the attraction though, creepy. A fine movie though. I love when the strangers see him kill himself.

  • I want to know what Charlie Kaufman was smoking when he wrote this screenplay. Or any of his other screenplays for that matter, but especially this one. Just a crazy, crazy movie! I salute John Malkovich for doing a movie that is just one big joke about him. I know it took some convincing, but I'm glad he did it.

  • I thought this movie was sort of awkwardly funny. I also think I will laugh so much more the next time I see it. The end is totally brilliant as is the swingers party.

  • I love this movie. Many big epics like this totally let you down or just get so boring at different points. Like Cleopatra, which is a good movie, its just too long, with too much dialogue. Spartacus breaks everything up with action scenes, feel good moments or great performances by its stars. Kubrick laid it out very well. He kept my interest the entire time. Big deal for a 3 hour movie.

  • I just love Audrey in everything that she does. This is flat out a great noir type thriller. I had many suspicions throughout, but had to revise my theory many times finally figuring it out near the end. Loved it!!!

  • People warned me about how cheesy and campy this film was. In the end I had absolutely no problem with it aside from a few bits of dialogue. Regardless this is a classic. I would have loved to see it in an old drive in theater, the way it was meant to be seen. Just a fun old film. Our worries are much different than they were back then.

  • There really is not much too be said about Kurosawa that hasn't already been said. Great movie by a great film maker. I can see why George Lucas used this film as his main inspiration for Star Wars. I enjoyed looking for the similarities and the differences between the two movies. I can't wait to see more films in the Kurosawa-Mifune partnership.

  • I am not overly knowledgeable or even interested in modern dance, but I wanted to see this film before it was in Criterion. It was after all nominated for best documentary. When I finally watched it I admit I was not that fond of it (which would have been the 1st Criterion film that I could say that about). After every scene I was asking myself "What the hell was that?" None of it made sense to me. This was not acceptable to me. I watched it again, this time with the commentary by Wim Wenders, and also read up a bit on the film. This made everything so much clearer. Wim and Pina's vision for the film became evident and because of Wim's explanations of the dances I understood the story that was being told. I strongly encourage listening to the commentary because if you are anything like me you will be lost and not like this film. I also want to see it in 3D.

  • My first go around with one of Hitchcock's earlier features, and it did not disappoint. I thought it started slow, but that seemed on purpose after it took off on the train. I admit I had no idea what was going on for the longest time which is a nice change of pace for me with so many movies being so predictable. Margaret Lockwood was lovely and she reminds me a lot of Olivia de Havilland which makes me wonder if she was just too sweet for Hitchcock's liking and that is why she was never in any more of his films. Or maybe just because she wasn't blonde.

  • Another Hitchcock classic. I was very unsure about this film at the beginning, but not in the same way as I was for The Lady Vanishes. At first I was unsure if I was going to like this one at all. But of course the "Master of Suspense" did not disappoint me in the end. How can you not love Ingrid Bergman? The dream sequence by Dali was really neat too. I would have loved to overhear the discussions between Dali and Hitchcock.

  • This is one of those movies that while you are watching it you might sometimes forget the truth in it. I found it easy to think about the twisted mind behind it all. But of course McQueen and the films writer were not really behind anything, they just put history to film and did a damn good job of it. While watching Hunger, I found myself thinking "this is just another sad event from a very long time ago". But again it wasn't that long ago. The Hunger Strike of 1981 would still be considered modern history, recent enough that many would gloss over it (at least on this side of the planet, far from The Troubles). To me, Hunger too seems far away to the degree that it does not seem like a historical drama. I think that is a testament to the story telling ability of McQueen. I love historical dramas but sometimes they feel too much like fiction with not enough truth. Where as this film (if I didn't already know it was a true story) felt like fiction that could easily be real. Good film, worth some further viewings.

  • Hitchcock can not go wrong, but I would have to say that this one is by far my least favorite. At some point I will give it another shot and hope I will like it better. More to come once I do.

  • This is a film about very little, but also a film about everything. I am writing this entry during the films end credits while it is still fresh in my mind and am beginning to understand pieces more as I am typing these words. It is a very Italian movie that could have easily been made by Fellini. Sorrentino deserves all the praise he has gotten and will get. I can picture this film becoming a sort of biography or cultural necessity for Italy in say 40 years or so. Much like Citizen Kane and Gone With the Wind have in the US. There are so many great things about this film worth discussing that I am not sure where to begin. The title was certainly appropriate as the film was a site to see, beautiful, as was the music. I both love and despise Rome now and those feelings ping-ponged back and forth throughout the film in the same way the tone did. Happy, wild, regretful, lonely, bitter, serine, depressed, sorrowful, awe inspiring. The film's tone seemed to change along with Jep's emotions. I also seemed to relate to the aging Jep a bit too, especially about feeling slightly misanthropic at times. I think a truly GREAT BEAUTY of a film. One I look forward to seeing again. Everyone is trying to find their own "great beauty" in life. That's what it is about.

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