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The Top Ten

by locke

Created 07/05/12

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A top ten Criterion is very hard to come up with there are so many great films (thare are also personal favorites) to choose from. Having a great edition helps, but the eclipse is included even though they lack supplements. I could easily do another top ten of just the best editions, a top ten of the films that most deserve a bluray, a top ten of films that most deserve an upgrade. I do have to have seen the entirety of the discs in question. Overall I've seen 255 of the main line collection and about half of the eclipse.

  • This is the ultimate treatment of any classic film on dvd or bluray, in my opinion. And it is a film that highly deserves it, Kurasawa's finest work is one of the finest works of art in the cinematic firmament.

  • I'd never have thought this would wind up such a personal favorite. But I was quickly blown away by the set, and it is truly the extras that make this what it is, the outtakes are perhaps better than the feature film itself, and the additional "films" of Redding and Hendrix are absolutely fantastic. I'm not generally a fan of this subgenre of documentaries, so it is still surprising how much I love this set.

  • People are often surprised when I say this is my favorite Kubrick, it took many repeat viewings but the taut, bristling nature of this film just narrowly puts it ahead of Dr. Strangelove for me. This is a film that gets better every time I see it, and I'm so glad Criterion put together this great edition.

  • A decade ago I first heard about this film and began a quest to seek it out, after a few years of searching I finally found it at a legendary los angeles video rental house, it was a 'house copy' that had been taped off of an AMC screening a decade or two before that! The film was worth the effort, it's McCarey's finest work as a director and one of the thematically richest films to come out of 1930s Hollywood. Criterion finally releasing this was hugely exciting for me, and it was fantastic to view the film at an enormously improved quality.

  • The extras may be sparse, but the films are top notch. There Was a Father is my favorite film of Ozu's, emotionally devastating, I was stunned at how much I connected to the film, even though I always find powerful emotional connections in Ozu's storytelling. And to accompany it, The Only Son is one of his finest early works. I wish Criterion would hurry up and release more eclipse and main line releases, already!

  • It is disturbing how relevant this film is from year to year, often in new ways. During the American invasions of Iraq & Afghanistan, the film had a new context, and now in the Arab Spring, Libya & Syria it has all sorts of new contexts that continue to keep it fresh and have me constantly reevaluating it upwards. An Incredible piece, though I was torn on including this film or Z, it was the full package of features that put this film on the list, What a thorough and brilliant way to present the film.

  • A staggering bluray, I feel like I'm projecting a pristine film print when I view it. I go back and forth on my favorite Bergman, but this one keeps rising to the top on repeat viewings; the religious arguments just resonate so much, more so with each passing year.

  • Brooks managed to take everything great and awful about television production and wrap it up in one of the best love-triangle stories of the modern age. The film never gets old and continues to get better, and the truth of that opening dash to deliver a tape for broadcast continues to delight me every single time.

  • The best eclipse set so far has four truly stunning films, incredible works of art that have been unjustly forgotten in the often limited western canonization of japanese cinema. Mr. Thank You remains my favorite, but there is not a sour note to be found in any of these four triumphs. Incredible. Give us another set immediately!

  • I've been clamouring for these kinescope treasures to not be forgotten for years. What a delight it was that Criterion brought a completely forgoteen part of television history back to circulation.

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