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Punks, Politics, and Expression

by Cinemacannon

Created 12/18/13

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Attitude, anger, anti-art, personal agression on society values is only a tip of the iceberg description of these singular films that can only be described as PUNK.

Personal note: I might as well call this list 'All about Cox', no pun.

  • If anyone was closer to the punk persona, it was Derek Jarman. He brought genre splicing to its knese with Queen Elizabeth the first and her thirst for knowledge summons angel Ariel, to show her England of the future. Jarman brings fourth a post apocoliptic fairy tale of a girl punk gang whose soul purpose was to wipe out the individuals of mediocrity and conformity standing close to their ultimate demise, emotions. A Thatcher-era avant-garde experiment devilishly smeared with sinister megalomaniacs, fascist police, church orgies, and pure chaos Jarman's hellish tune of anger and lost youth focuses a all knowing hypocrisy that rules over our feign illusion of liberation when revolution becomes marketable.

  • Even a punk can see that a repo man life is truly intense,or at least not too different with the emergence of L.A. hardcore punk of the 80's. Alex Cox's throttle scream blends the styles in his own way centered around a L.A. punk's brutal and bizarre experience becoming arepo man; not to mention a mysterious Chevy Malibu that harbors a Eerie secret. A dirty tasteful tip of the hat to Aldrich's "Kiss Me Deadly", Cox's regan-era riot satire of punk politics and american identity throws a wicked wrench into the notion of freedom of choice as another invisible prison.

  • You might not see this film as a punk film persay, but with another look Alex Cox's unsettling and macabre jorneys of a early american multi talented politician and his band of "immortals" that travel to Nicaragua to establish democracy has the attitude and angst as punk. You can't forget a contrasting score done by Joe Strummer. Cox's peckinpah-esq inferno play on violence and the insidious nature of modern American idealism stands patrioticly absurd as its ending

  • Love and punk scarcely is ever seen in the same room, but these two created the breach that would only last a short period of time and remembered forever. Alex Cox brandished a surreal and savage scream of legendary bassist Sid Vicious and his tumultuous relationship with Nancy Spungen as both descend into a brutal spiral of violence, addiction and media corruption. Cox's sympathetic and engrosing satire of political decline as well as a anti-hero punk style Bonnie and Clyde not only capturing a mad rendering of punk identity and its inevitable path toward mainstream culture, but a intimate scope of Sid and Nancy's challenging innocencee. A fierce statement that punk never dies while there still exists love for it.

  • Youth is an abrasive existence. Which is why punk hits such a high note in nihilism. The burden of political and economic change vs conscience. But is it really a statement or just fashion? Take Jimmy, a rebellious teenager growing up in late 60's London spellbound by rock n' roll leads him to a mod riding, drug fuled, sex driven journey that would only lead him to the edge of isolation and self-awareness. Based on The Who's classic album Franc Roddam's rebel with a cause ignites the style of neorealism to a angry and angst behind the eyes of culture, conformity, transgressive and lost adolescene, while youth is at its most vulnerable. At the other end of this brash tale is a almost preminisive welcome mat to Punk's birth and rock's untimate decent into mainstream.

37 comments

  • By Peter_Wilson
    December 22, 2013
    09:44 AM

    Like the list. Your writing is very good in the above comments.
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    • By Cinemacannon
      December 22, 2013
      12:51 PM

      Thanks so much, man. I try to capture the film in a non-pretentious way, trying as best as I can to Stear clear of anything to heady. Thanks for being a huge supporter. You keep doing what your doing, too. :)
  • By Cinemacannon
    December 22, 2013
    12:50 PM

    Thanks so much, man. I try to capture the film in a non-pretentious way, trying as best as I can to Stear clear of anything to heady. Thanks for being a huge supporter. You keep doing what your doing, too. :)
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    • By Peter_Wilson
      December 22, 2013
      02:15 PM

      By The way have you checked out Ending A Career?
  • By Peter_Wilson
    December 23, 2013
    10:46 PM

    Hey Cinemacannon I know I'm always recommending lists, but if your interested I've created a few new ones. Iconic Props Inventively Used Set Pieces The face of death Prison Break Memorable Quotes The Outcast
    Reply
  • By zacmegpresmick
    December 28, 2013
    03:05 PM

    Maybe Sid and Nancy?
    Reply
  • By zacmegpresmick
    December 28, 2013
    03:11 PM

    Maybe Sid and Nancy?
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    • By Cinemacannon
      December 28, 2013
      05:40 PM

      Iv'e been looking for a copy to watch before I put it up. I havent seen it for a while
  • By Peter_Wilson
    December 29, 2013
    02:12 PM

    You think Brazil could fit into this category? BTW I've got a couple new lists if your interested.
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    • By Cinemacannon
      January 02, 2014
      04:25 PM

      I don't think it would really benefit, but its a great film satirising the political machine. I'll definitely check them out. I finally added Sid and Nancy.
    • By Peter_Wilson
      January 04, 2014
      08:23 PM

      It doesn't really have the punk aspect.
  • By Collection
    January 08, 2014
    07:00 PM

    Wow, this list was so good at first glance, I cannot help but to keep coming back to it. While I have your attention, let me make the case for a pair of films which I believe merit inclusion in your list. The strongest candidate would be Quadrophenia, followed by La Haine. It is understandable why these would have been overlooked until now as none of these are shown as being in your Collection. I will also reserve any commentary on these films, as I would rather wait for you to screen each film and see what your take is.
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    • By Cinemacannon
      January 08, 2014
      08:08 PM

      Thank you so much, collection. I need to see thosr filns. I will consider them. I think netflix is streaming quad. Hope you like the list anyway.
    • By Cinemacannon
      January 08, 2014
      08:08 PM

      Films*
    • By Collection
      January 08, 2014
      11:30 PM

      Yes, your list is grand. Based on the list you generated, I am intrigued as to what kind of music you're making. Tell me how I might go about hearing your synth/pop project?
    • By Cinemacannon
      January 09, 2014
      12:05 AM

      http://lapses.bandcamp.com. There you go. It's more retrowave than synth pop. But who pays attention to labels anyway.
    • By Cinemacannon
      January 09, 2014
      02:51 PM

      In all honesty, I think I'm better at film than my music. Its just my opinion.
    • By Cinemacannon
      January 14, 2014
      05:41 PM

      I added Quadrophenia!
    • By Collection
      January 14, 2014
      08:08 PM

      Sure did enjoy sampling your tracks and thanks for offering same, Matt. I dug the refrain and bass line in the original composition and thought you did a fine job with your rendition of New Order's "Ceremony." This only serves to reinforce that influences are an important aspect of the film, music, or any other art that one creates. I recently procured reel-to-reel tapes of traditional Japanese and Spanish music belonging to an Idaho-based painter that I enjoyed all the more when imagining how the music may have served as inspiration in their visual art. I too tend to be indifferent towards labels, however I find they serve a purpose in making music accessible (e.g. witch house). Moreover, that Quadrophenia recap above within the context of your list is on point!
    • By Cinemacannon
      January 15, 2014
      01:26 AM

      Thanks so much for your complements. I am working on a EP that should be put in March or late feb, Start Button is going to be on it, but unfortunately not ceremony, I already had one legal issue graze my skin and I don't want to have another (long story), Oh a lot of films I've seen really inspire the music I do. I really started thinking of my youth watching Blade Runner or Explorers, or Flight of the Navigator to be in a mindset to write, but a lot of the times too, it's just the image I see that get created in music wether it comes from a significance source or not. That's really interesting about your friend your helped out. Visuals are real important to make in music. I love conceptual art through music, that what the EP I'm doing is base do on, a short idea that's more or a retro future story. But it's coming along smoothly. I would like to hear your friends music. Is witch house the name? Even these films here in this list: music serves a vital purpose in self-expression and what's best is self-discovery. Music is a true mirror of the soul. About Quadrophenia, I was eating a bowl of cereal late nite when I just so happened to come on. I truly loved it, I was skeptical seeing criterion's press on it, but it's a brutal and beautiful angst yell. I am going to check out La haine next, for sure. Thanks for enjoying wha I said too, It means a lot that what I wrote transposes to someone else. I dig your list jezebel a lot. I'm going to go check more of yours out. Thanks, again C!
  • By Peter_Wilson
    January 10, 2014
    04:05 PM

    Cinemacannon, I've made a new list, Your Favorite Criterion Edition, I'm trying to compile members favorite edition with there comment of the film.
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    • By Cinemacannon
      January 14, 2014
      05:43 PM

      Going to check this out. I woud love to be apart of it, Jack.
    • By Peter_Wilson
      January 15, 2014
      01:39 PM

      Glad to hear that.
    • By Cinemacannon
      January 15, 2014
      01:55 PM

      do you need my favorite Edition?
    • By Peter_Wilson
      January 16, 2014
      08:04 PM

      It would be much appreciated.
    • By Cinemacannon
      January 16, 2014
      08:34 PM

      How would you want me to send it to you?
    • By Peter_Wilson
      January 16, 2014
      10:56 PM

      I guess I misunderstood, just go to the list, and comment about your favorite edition along with what you think about it, and I'll add it onto the list.
  • By Michael Brakemeyer
    May 26, 2014
    01:22 AM

    Excellent choices and comments. I'm a huge fan of Alex Cox and yes..."Walker" is definitely got that punk sensibility through and through. A great film that deserves a second look.
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    • By Cinemacannon
      June 11, 2014
      03:45 PM

      sorry for the long response, Michael. Thank you so much, that means a lot to me. It might not appear to it at first but it definitely is a punk film.
  • By Barry Moore
    June 05, 2014
    04:45 PM

    I would strongly recommend Dennis Hopper's masterpiece 'Out of the Blue' (premiered in 1980, though the print bears a 1981 copyright date) as a valuable addition to this category. This remarkable film, a Canadian production helmed by an American director and featuring American actors in most of the leading roles, captures the zeitgeist of alienated youth as the Seventies shifted into the Eighties, and is an important document of the punk scene in Vancouver, where the film was shot. Linda Manz is extraordinary as the troubled teenager Cebe, enamored of Elvis Presley and the Sex Pistols, and Dennis Hopper, while powerfully portraying her alcoholic, abusive father, probably never surpassed himself as a director here.
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    • By Cinemacannon
      June 11, 2014
      03:41 PM

      wow, I definitely need to see this. It sounds really intriguing. I really do enjoy his directing. I'm curious of why this one slipped through the loop. Thanks, Barry
  • By obscuredbyclouds
    June 10, 2014
    04:01 PM

    Great list! It would be awesome if Criterion got more Jarman in their collection. Still haven't seen any of Cox's films, though he looks intriguing.
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    • By Cinemacannon
      June 11, 2014
      03:43 PM

      I agree on the Jarman statement. I'm just finishing Caravaggio. It's definitely worth consideration. Cox's films are great and worth your view. Did you know he also co-screen wrote Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas?
  • By Benjamin White
    June 18, 2014
    11:03 AM

    More PUNK cinema from Criterion... perhaps Blank Generation or Smithereens?
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    • By Benjamin White
      June 18, 2014
      11:04 AM

      Wait... Alan Clarke's SCUM! Yeah, it's borstal punks, but you know....
    • By Cinemacannon
      June 18, 2014
      01:57 PM

      Damn!!! Good Call
  • By mockturtle28
    June 24, 2014
    06:35 AM

    I saw sid & nancey Its tragic. I like true stories like this. I don't know about the other ones really.
    Reply

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