Film_591w_12angrymen_original

Confined

by MrCannon

Created 04/10/13

Edit List

Sometimes one location is all it takes to make a great film. These films might have small entries or other places to these points, evidently, one location dominates the story.

  • If ignorance is bliss, this film challenges it to edge of revolution. Twelve jurors on a hot new york day sit in small room to decide the fate of a young boy who might have murdered his father. SIdney Lumet's moral claustrophobic probe into a changing America right at the cusp of the 50s is at its most crucial, where innocence is a question and optimism is considered a brave statement of justice. Showing us twelve individuals who are more human than we think.

  • Anything is possible in Czech new wave icon Milos Forman's slapstick comedic situations that occur when a group of motley fireman hold a ball to celebrate a dear elderly employee's years of service, while at the same time clumsily putting together a beauty contest. All taking place in a crowded ballroom, Forman's wildly humorous attack on the absurdity of communism is a blazing satire that still fans the flame as a ribtickling social commentary on political encasement.

  • A surreal and bizzare experiance with no exit in site in Bunuel's subjective entrapment of a group of upper class citizens that are unknowingly unable to leave. With no rational way to escape the room they are trapped in, they resort to a unified breakdown. With a narrative as ambiguous as the situation, Bunuel's comic nightmare of high society classes obliterated can be placed as one of his most elaborate portrays of foolishness amongs these lambs, where the negation of bourgeois nature plays a part in a ultimate absurdist practical joke.

  • What do you get when three gangsters are locked in a room for a unknown amount of time hiding out from the cops? You get Norman Mailer's experimental surge into American masculinity with sly playful realism. Mailer's scriptless and narrative broken story pulls reality and fiction together as improvisational statements on the true nature of man locked up.

  • Today's dinner special is a vast and temporal dive into the minds of play write and actor Wallace Shawn and theater director Andre Gregory as they meet in a elegant New York City restaurant to catch up on a long absence. these monologue conversations begin coming more deeper involved in dry fabric of existence and survival in so called reality, ranging from the actuality to the fantastic. Malle's enclosed conversation of two men who question living when in the end to live means to experiance life through our own perception of experiance whether we understand ourselves or not. This nostalgic dinner becomes a illuminating and self-aware cinematic experiance.

  • Buckle your belt tight in Kiarostami's boxed in study of identification, memory and political philosophy in a mans desperate search for someone to bury him in exchange for money. Mostly taking place inside the mans car, Kiraostami's semi-filmatic dream ponders the line of life and death with intimate humanism.

  • Where can you get to know someone just for a few minutes? Try a taxi, there is a story in everyone. Jarmusch's sci-fi like comedy about cosmic connections on a night around the world weaving five stories where language, race, and personality stand empathetically parallel to one another in taxis. Some of the cabs are almost framed like UFO's as it comically enhances Jarmusch's humanistic vision of alienation and isolation on this planet is a boxed view of contact regardless of who we are. As well as Jarmusch's passionate love for film.

  • The closer you float to another the more tighter the tension gets. As it does in this innocent one day boat trip gone wrong as a couple's eventful encounter with a hitchhiker leads to them to tagging him long on their boat outing. Polanski's claustrophobic castoff of primitive and masculine intentions is almost a pure breakdown of human decadence within a minimalist game, and in a way, an inside-out homage to Hitchcock's confined masterpiece 'Lifeboat'.

  • Art's nature is ambiguous as human desires tend to portray. Nothing is more mysterious than in this eerie study of love and time in the form of a man and a woman who might have or might have not meet in a vast chateau a year before. Still regarded today as Resnais' most poetic play on cinematic and human memory and a brilliant mystery film where the symmetrical becomes absurd and the absurd becomes our tour host in a place where time does not exist.

  • Who says ignorance is bliss? Not Marco Ferrari and his darkly comical lesion of personal entrapment enclosing on a gas mask designer's one night romance with a gun he discovers in his pantry that might have belong to the feared and loved bank robber John Dillinger. Practically only taking place in the man's home, Ferrari unmasks modernism and conformity in this quasi-science fiction Italian new wave look at a man who desires nothing but space.

  • The mind is a trenchant and submissive place, as the closed-in spaced occupied in Sam Fullers cautionary tale is by a smug reporter looking for the big story to win him a the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for solving a murder in a mental institution while assuming the role of a inmate. While trapped in Fuller's social commentary about desperation, disillusion, madness, racism, and American dreams turned into a-bombs. Fuller always had a knack for telling the true evils of politics and its internal crippling to the individual and the masses, but it would never boil to the surface like it did in the boxed in expressionistic satirical vision of confinement and its limits searching for a way out only to find temporal and political horror.

  • What would be worse the physical of mental prison? predecessor of the new wave Robert Bresson plays with metonymy and singles out metaphors on the subject of imprisonment as a French resistance fighter devises a way to break out of a elaborate prison. Bresson's distaste for story and irony stands strong in this unconventional escape from monotony to spiritual freedom. One of his best devices, using sound as the antagonist.

  • The most heaviest weight is the prison of truth some have to lock away in order to survive. In Altman's confessional fictional probe of Richard Nixon who isolates himself in a room to dictate private recordings of his political convictions. Philip Baker Hall gives a powerful and vigorous performance as our tragic victim trapped in TV screens and soundwaves of a tape recordering apparatus. Where this film is less of a confession from Nixon's, than of Altman's himself who shows where acting, image, time, and space can become a ultimate device in manipulation. Remember, "for eyes only".

  • Some of the precious secrets are kept under one roof, in this case Pasolini creates a terrifying display of modernism and it hidden deceptions as four aristocrats conduct a heinous experiment taking place in a secluded mansion where kidnapped children are subjected to unimaginable levels of humiliation and degradtion. Pasolini adapts Marquis De Sade's epic novel into a personal statement of a vulnerablily and amorality in socierty and its future implications, using 1940s fascist Italy as a allegory on power and present sexuality as weapons of our own destruction.

  • Those unsavory memories that are left tucked away can come back to haunt us. Just ask Guy Maddin's semi-autobiographic nightmare of his fictional character Guy, and his return to his lonely childhood island to fix up the old light house where he grew up with his sexually budding sister, the band of motley orphans living in his home, to his menacing over protective mother who ruled over the island with an iron fist. Secrets and memories start to boil to the surface mixed with expressionistic horror and erotic obsessions. Maddin explores the world of adolescence, sexuality and the sub-conscience where it's a single room of ones derailed mind.

  • Seclusion and privacy is about to be disturbed in Polanski's darkly comedic quasi-mirror image of his 1962 film "Knife in the Water", that shifts to a wirily wormy husband, to his bored wife vacationing in secluded gothic castle where monotony ensues their days until a burly escaped convict appears testing the couples normality to its limits. Polanski's absurdist take on amorality, masculinity and distaste with the upper class is a trapped-in claustrophobic noir comedy that shows us some eggs are meant to be broke.

  • Perfection is an illusion, tell that to Jeanne Dileman, a stay-at-home widow who does all the house work, takes care of her teenage son, and squeeze in time for her afternoon appointments as a prostitute. Shot entirely with a static camera at mid level throughout the entire film, and practically in real time, Ackerman feminist examination shows a disturbed closed in world of a woman's perception and trapped-in aggression through time and space that becomes her ultimate escape, and in a way.. the film itself.

  • Digging out of our own primitive intentions is a difficult task. Hiroshi Teshigahara's claustrophobic experiment in human relations is at this point when a wandering entomologist studying a new rare beetle in the desert is forced to stay with a widow in a house in sand pit after missing the last bus home, the truth is he may never get to leave. Teshigahara's study on human significance is one of cinemas unsung psychological imprints.

  • You are invited to a special gathering in the country as Jean Renoir graciously opens and close the doors on a group of borgoiuse citizens gathering at a chatue for the weekend as a wicked game of political apathy and broken hearts ensues. Inventively plays with depth-of-field shows people as instruments playing off one another, commenting devilishly on class defiance. Renoir's film still shows how cupids arrow is also a deadly weapon.

  • Your train ticket says one way in Ingmar Bergman's eerie journey into eroticism and isolation as Anna, her young son Johan, and Anna's sister Ester travel to a secluded hotel In war ridden no-mans land while all three souls are tested to their limit of desire. Bergman has always had a sensitive touch for portraying humans as elements of power and weakness, but here he fearful explores the true nature of the self still trying to understand its own language in a alien world.

  • Prison manifests the most purely entrapped environment known to man. But to Joe Collins, the urge to escape for good becomes tangible when enlisting his cell mates for a elaborate prison break before a ruthless captin Munsy bears his diabolical shadow on thier path toward freedom. Jules Dassin blows the gates open in a towering infero portrait on post war america where power, manipulation, control in prison mirrors a outside existence where we are still trapped, body and soul.

80 comments

  • By oz-rob
    September 20, 2013
    06:32 PM

    Great List,, a few more for consideration. #62 ,The Passion of Joan of Arc, #129 Le Trou, #650 A Man Escaped, #392 Women in the Dunes, #345 My Night at Mauds..
    Reply
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 20, 2013
      06:38 PM

      A man escaped is a great add, woman under the dunes was in debate on putting that on this list, but it does make sense, Le Trou and My Night I haven't seen, but thanks for the suggestions!
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 21, 2013
      02:14 AM

      Sorry, I meant Woman in the Dunes
    • By Kristen Maynor
      January 31, 2014
      05:51 PM

      Definitely Le Trou!
  • By Brock Pace
    September 21, 2013
    11:48 PM

    Recently re-released, AUTUMN SONATA takes place all inside of the daughters house, with the exception of some flashback sequences. Love this list.
    Reply
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 22, 2013
      01:54 AM

      This is true Brock, never though about autumn, a somber and brilliant film I might add. I think this will have to make it to the list, indeed. Thanks for the love!
  • By Peter_Wilson
    September 22, 2013
    10:50 AM

    Great List! Here are some possible additions The Passion Of Joan Of Arc, I believe it would fit nicely, almost entirely shot in the court room. Also The Lady Vanishes and A Night To Remember and Anatomy Of A Murder and Secret Honor might not be some bad additions.
    Reply
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 22, 2013
      12:10 PM

      Damn good suggestions, Mr. Ripper. Secret Honor is being added I need to see some of the other ones like Night to remeber and anatomy, but the Lady Vanishes is great, too. Thanks again!
    • By Peter_Wilson
      September 22, 2013
      12:46 PM

      Cinemacannon, I would also recommend you watch the Czech film The Ear (1970), sadly it's a very tough film to get a hold of, but is well worth it. Also I would like you to take a look at my list and tell me what you think. http://www.criterion.com/lists/157365-akira-kurosawa-s-favorite-movies
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 22, 2013
      01:46 PM

      The ear, it sounds familiar. Maybe youtube has a stream of it, I get surprised to find some Gems streaming on there. I dig your list man. Did you research Kurosawa for his faves? I love it!
    • By Peter_Wilson
      September 22, 2013
      09:17 PM

      Yes I have done a lot of research on Kurosawa, who happens to be a favorite of mine. Also I'm glad to hear that you liked my list. I've also been looking over all of your lists, which you have done some great work with. Check out my new list which is under construction, I should be able to finish it up tomorrow. http://www.criterion.com/lists/157548-beginning-a-career
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 22, 2013
      09:31 PM

      That incredible, thanks a lot really! I try to have a passionate and simple way of putting these lists together. I'm defiantly going to check it out. Plus I'm going to add a few more to this list. Working on Jeanne Dielman, and Secret Honor.
    • By oz-rob
      September 23, 2013
      05:03 AM

      Interested in Central European film eg The Ear, it is readily available along with many other uncommon titles, " Second Run " UK. great transfers and accompanied with booklets essays etc..
    • By Peter_Wilson
      September 23, 2013
      12:02 PM

      I finished the list up for now, with 39 additions. If you know of any other debut films in the collection let me know.
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 23, 2013
      01:59 PM

      I love the idea of the list. I definelty will give some suggestions.
  • By Cinemacannon
    September 22, 2013
    09:31 PM

    That incredible, thanks a lot really! I try to have a passionate and simple way of putting these lists together. I'm defiantly going to check it out. Plus I'm going to add a few more to this list. Working on Jeanne Dielman, and Secret Honor.
    Reply
    • By Peter_Wilson
      September 23, 2013
      12:12 PM

      I don't know how much time you spend on IMDB, But I thought you might like to check out my list there. Here's the link, http://www.imdb.com/list/5n1QrvkiWNE/
  • By oz-rob
    September 23, 2013
    05:08 AM

    Polish film Kanal #284 is confined almost entirely underground in the tunnels of the Warsaw sewers..
    Reply
  • By Aleksi
    September 23, 2013
    09:15 AM

    Good list. A few more suggestions: Brand Upon the Brain; Cul de Sac; Salo
    Reply
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 23, 2013
      10:32 AM

      Just added salo! I remeber your one list is really elaborate and well thought out too, Aleksi, keep it up! I am debating on brand and cul, even though they are subjected to one island but in many different locations within it, but I might be a hypocrite in saying that since a few of the ones I added to this list have the same implications are far as location/space. I think I will consider those two as a add.
    • By Aleksi
      September 23, 2013
      11:05 AM

      Thanks, CC. The theme of your list is one that has always intrigued me. (I once wrote an essay about malign and uncanny architecture in film.) Regarding Brand & Cul, they may not confined to a strictly single space, but a central architecture (and the extended space in which it exists) function as characters within the respective films, providing a decisive context for their stories (as in Marienbad, eg) that I believe would help them fit comfortably in this list.
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 23, 2013
      01:08 PM

      Added brand! Good point, Aleksi, it does make sense since I have marienbad.
  • By Peter_Wilson
    September 23, 2013
    07:21 PM

    Hunger might not be a bad addition, though shot in different locations of the prison, and even a couple of outdoor locations.
    Reply
    • By Cinemacannon
      September 23, 2013
      07:23 PM

      Good one, althought I didn't see it.
    • By Cinemacannon
      October 02, 2013
      01:06 AM

      Love the list, jack! Hope to see more form you!
  • By Cinemacannon
    September 23, 2013
    07:23 PM

    Although*
    Reply
    • By Peter_Wilson
      September 23, 2013
      08:07 PM

      I just finished up my list Beginning A Career with as many criterion debut films as I could find. Also please check out my IMDB list. http://www.imdb.com/list/5n1QrvkiWNE/
  • By paloz
    October 02, 2013
    11:04 AM

    "Rope", along with "12 angry men", might be one of the greatest chamber dramas.
    Reply
  • By Peter_Wilson
    October 03, 2013
    12:28 PM

    Hey, Cinemacannon I just created a new list, which is far from being finished, but I though you might like to check it out. http://www.criterion.com/lists/166924-daydreams I will be adding a note to each film on the list in the near future.
    Reply
  • By William Forrest
    October 14, 2013
    12:21 PM

    This list is definitely incomplete without HIGH AND LOW.
    Reply
  • By NAME
    October 16, 2013
    05:45 PM

    Hunger by Steve McQueen
    Reply
  • By Peter_Wilson
    October 18, 2013
    10:49 PM

    What's up Cinemacannon, I am working on a new list of my favorite entries to the collection, I thought you might like to check out. http://www.criterion.com/lists/167956-my-personal-favorites I also recently watched Kurosawa's The Lower Depths, don't know if you've seen it, if not I would definitely recommend you check it. It is almost entirely shot inside an old house.
    Reply
    • By Alexander Miller
      October 28, 2013
      08:40 AM

      Good List! I love 12 Angry Men, I make it a point to watch it at least once every year.
  • By jacobi-burton
    October 29, 2013
    09:10 PM

    The Passion of Joan of Arc?
    Reply
  • By scottb
    November 15, 2013
    04:17 PM

    How is Repulsion not on this list?!?!?!? It should be at the top!
    Reply
  • By AM
    November 17, 2013
    11:31 AM

    Butley (1973) Directed by Harold Pinter and starring Alan Bates. This 123 min. movie takes place in one office!
    Reply
    • By AM
      November 17, 2013
      12:10 PM

      Correction : running time for Butley is 129 minutes. Another one is The Caretaker (1963) Directed by Clive Donner and written by Harold Pinter. Also starring Alan Bates with Donald Pleasence and Robert Shaw. Most of this 100 min. movie takes place in an attic room.
  • By Peter_Wilson
    December 20, 2013
    03:45 PM

    Cinemacannon, Ending A Career is coming along better then expected, I've just added new additions, and I'm sure there will be more.
    Reply
  • By ilya
    January 01, 2014
    02:09 PM

    I would also like to add "the Rope" to this list.
    Reply
  • By Eric Levy
    February 04, 2014
    05:28 AM

    Hi again. Been checking this list and reading the comments, and I can't believe no one (including me) thought of this until now: SIMON OF THE DESERT!
    Reply
  • By NotInOurStars
    June 06, 2014
    11:34 PM

    Sanjuro wouldn't be a bad choice.
    Reply