• Three Reasons: Red Desert Three Reasons: Red Desert

    Those are our three reasons. What are yours?

16 comments

  • By Daniel
    March 23, 2011
    01:56 PM

    La Notte is OOP so can Criterion please give it the treatment it deserves. Not like those careless hacks at Fox did.
    Reply
  • By David Hollingsworth
    March 23, 2011
    04:57 PM

    1) One of Antonioni's masterpieces. 2) The haunting beauty of Monica Vitti. 3) The apocalyptic landscape.
    Reply
  • By Curtis
    March 24, 2011
    10:27 AM

    Agree with Daniel about La Notte; at the top of my of list of films needing the Criterion treatment.
    Reply
  • By MA
    March 24, 2011
    11:09 AM

    Yes, La Notte!
    Reply
  • By David Hollingsworth
    March 24, 2011
    02:13 PM

    I also agree as well. La Notte is another Antonioni masterpiece that deserves the best DVD/Blu-ray treatment.
    Reply
  • By Robert Nishimura
    March 29, 2011
    12:58 AM

    Here's a fan-made Three Reasons for La Notte http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NiL5D_sHNA
    Reply
  • By Douglas Duarte
    March 29, 2011
    03:43 PM

    • The mystery • The doubt • The hesitation
    Reply
  • By Sean Provost
    April 12, 2011
    07:18 PM

    I have not seen La Notte, but am quite curious about it and what I have read about this film. It sounds like a classic I woukd certainly purchase in the blu ray format:). You have my vote:). So let's see: 1) a classic, 2) mystery and 3) collectible.
    Reply
  • By Santos R. Vásquez
    April 13, 2011
    01:30 PM

    1) I'm in love with Monica Vitti, I'm in love with Monica Vitti, I'm in Love with Monica Vitti 2) Antonioni is no longer here - Long live the films of Michelangelo Antonioni! 3) One hell of a masterpiece and great commentary on society~
    Reply
  • By MIRCEA HUGYECZ
    April 13, 2011
    02:39 PM

    1;ANTONIONI,2 ;VITTI ,3 ;ANTONIONI +VITTI
    Reply
  • By Mark
    April 15, 2011
    10:59 AM

    1. Each frame is so lovingly composed. Need one say more? 2. Antonioni's direction here is so fluid, so relaxed and yet his picture spells out gloom and doom from the beginning. 3. A virtuosic feat of acting from Ms. Vitti. Antonioni shows us what a great beauty she is and Ms. Vitti gives us a pefectly calibrated performance of a woman who is breaking down: ever so slowly being broken down by her surroundings. Her portrayal of mental illness has just the right touch of tragedy and elegance.
    Reply
  • By mrkaje
    August 18, 2011
    06:10 PM

    Always loved the fruit vendor cart. The apples are painted -- silver.
    Reply
  • By B.S. W.
    July 01, 2012
    02:02 PM

    1.) Antonioni and Carlo Di Palma's photographer's eyes—"the eye that shapes"—in each and every frame 2.) The literal voice and song of the landscape as conveyed wordlessly by the despoiled mise en scène, so like a living behemoth consuming all, as well as lyrically, in the beautifully redemptive story and song of the virgin sea that she tells to her ailing son. 3.) Monica Vitti in one of her most outstanding performances in which she tragically conveys a desperate cry for love, understanding and acceptance from the belly of a fallen world that is, today, as timely as ever.
    Reply
  • By Barry Moore
    July 16, 2013
    09:11 PM

    1) Antonioni finding the beauty amid pollution and squalor; 2) the filmmaker suggesting how we might all cope with our compromised lives; 3) the expressionistic, stylized use of color
    Reply
  • By Hubert
    April 15, 2014
    04:11 AM

    A book I have read on Antonioni's work refers to an unreleased scene of the movie where a pinewood had been painted in white. That must have been amazing.
    Reply
  • By Vince C.
    July 29, 2014
    03:35 PM

    Monica Vitti! As Woody Allen said in Play It Again, Sam, "Whoever you are, I love you! I want to have your child!"
    Reply

Or using your Criterion.com account.

You are logged in to your Criterion.com account as . Log out.